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Author Topic: Looking to get into racing. pure stock?  (Read 4113 times)
bonescrub
Newbie
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Posts: 7


« on: September 24, 2007, 08:16:15 am »

Would like get started in racing. Been trying to understand the rules and learn as much as I can. I was thinking of the pure stock class. Seems to be the cheapest  to get started.
Any suggestions on how I should go about it?
probably too late for this season to get started might have to wait till next season.

thanks
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DRTRK23
Newbie
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Posts: 98


« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2007, 12:27:07 pm »

do a little homework and spend the money upfront to buy a good car. It will cost you more on the front end but you will be more sucessful in learning with good equipment and it will save you money in the long run. Remember, you get what you pay for .....

Chris
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bonescrub
Newbie
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Posts: 7


« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2007, 01:14:29 pm »

where do you suggest getting a car from? I have been looking on southeasttexas.com  for  cars that are cheap. what is the most important thing to have in a car? My guess is a decent drivetrain. Seems the the monte carlo is the most popular body style, is there a reason for that or are they just plentiful?

thanks,
chris

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haulsas
Newbie
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Posts: 494


« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2007, 01:52:51 pm »

There are several things to consider
        1. Roll cage, you are looking for a roll cage that has good welds, is not bent from a roll or hit. No pits in the weld seams and the frame loops are one piece of bent pipe that ties to the frame straight and not at an angle. You need it to be equally braced on both sides of the frame tie points and to have gussets as extra protection. Look for an X brace in the center of the cage and see that it ties to the frame loops at an intersection that is braced in three of four directions (like a T laying on its side)
         2.  A Monte Carlo has coil spring suspension and is a metric frame. All tracks allow this car as a Bomber, A camaro is leaf spring as is a Nova which both are Uni body frame cars. Soime tracks don't allow Camaros in the pure stock class. However, if you want to run a standard transmission it will be easier to set it up for a clutch if thats the way you end up going. I have a 80 Monte Carlo and I ran a Nova last year. I had trouble with the leaf spring car, mostly because I didn't and still don't really know alot about all the tricks, However the Monte carlos seems to be easier to drive (for me) But there is ALOT of front running leaf spring cars. So like I said, its preferrence.
         Just go look at cars you see for sale. They put a sign on it for it to be looked at,,, Posting that add should get you some replies.
     But like the other driver wrote SPEND THE MONEY up front,,,,If racing was cheap everyone would do it........He's giving you advice I didn't take from someone and I spent the off seasone building a new car to replace the wore out one I bought,,,,,Good Luck
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Jonathan Johnson
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Posts: 276


WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2007, 01:53:15 pm »

Look around on the internet. www. racingjunk.com, some other boards like that.  www.whowon.com is another good one.  Then ask around.  People (who are honest) will tell you about cars, whether they are good or not etc.  Be sure the cage structure is good in whatever you buy!  Good luck.  Also, try to find a track record.  A good car can help a new or bad driver, where as the opposite is not usually the case.  Good Luck!

Jonathan Johnson
« Last Edit: September 24, 2007, 01:55:22 pm by Jonathan Johnson » Logged
bonescrub
Newbie
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Posts: 7


« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2007, 03:43:30 pm »

So i take it that it's better to find a "race car" rather than  take a car  and turn it into a race car?
thanks
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Rowdy51
Newbie
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Posts: 488



« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2007, 07:00:23 pm »

find a car with a good solid roll cage in it.
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StreetStock 51
bonescrub
Newbie
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Posts: 7


« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2007, 11:53:43 pm »

Is putting a good roll cage in  a car that difficult? Seems if the "right" car came around it could be worth it to put a roll cage in it.
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Rowdy51
Newbie
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Posts: 488



« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2007, 12:31:15 am »

well just about any car you can put a cage in i got a old firebird im usin for parts i could have a roll cage put in and build it up to race it but its alot of time cutting and welding to have it done right (if you do it yourself) last place i checked that installed roll cages could install a basic cage for around 1200 but i dont know if there still open or not in my opion its easier to find a car with a good cage in it. not sumthing to exspensive unless your wanting a high dollar car. my first year i just found a old rollin chassis car with a good cage in it and started out in the modstock class just to get some track under my belt and that way if i wrecked it and totaled the car it wasnt a high dollar car i had a bunch of money tied up in.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2007, 12:38:30 am by Rowdy51 » Logged

StreetStock 51
umpracer
Newbie
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Posts: 18


« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2007, 12:47:31 am »

Hey bonescrub we have a metric monte carlo for sale can be bought has a roller or running, give me a call at (409)794-3002
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bonescrub
Newbie
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Posts: 7


« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2007, 01:26:11 am »

well just about any car you can put a cage in i got a old firebird im usin for parts i could have a roll cage put in and build it up to race it but its alot of time cutting and welding to have it done right (if you do it yourself) last place i checked that installed roll cages could install a basic cage for around 1200 but i dont know if there still open or not in my opion its easier to find a car with a good cage in it. not sumthing to exspensive unless your wanting a high dollar car. my first year i just found a old rollin chassis car with a good cage in it and started out in the modstock class just to get some track under my belt and that way if i wrecked it and totaled the car it wasnt a high dollar car i had a bunch of money tied up in.

Ok that makes sense, plus never thought  it would cost 1200 for a roll cage. Shocked

 Ok  stupid question  potentially, what does metric mean when speaking of frames of cars?
Also what is the life-span of a pure stock car?
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HS89
Newbie
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Posts: 101


« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2007, 02:53:46 am »

The life of a pure stock depends on how well its built. My niece is driving the car that I drove in bomber about 5 years ago. It has been through me, my nephew and my niece and it is still a good car. It is a 76 Malibu. The one thing that I have noticed about a metric frame car is that it tends to bend easier that a full frame car. The draw back of a full frame car is finding skins, they are so hard to come by.  I now drive a Monte Carlo and we've had to straighten it a couple of times, but that is part of racing. If you find a chassis, make sure the frame is straight. I hope you are getting all the information you need from this forum.
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2007 Outlaw Stock Points Champion
racegirl
Newbie
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Posts: 17


« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2007, 09:50:08 pm »

Our car is for Sale as a roller
Call Tracy (Skeeter) 289-5382 for more info
Was the #59 Pure Stock
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DRTRK23
Newbie
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Posts: 98


« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2007, 12:37:10 pm »

you can build your own, and if you want to go that route thats fine. I CAN promise you from past experience however ... it is WAY cheaper to buy one than it is to build one. Nobody ever thinks about the little things adding up, seat, gauges,belts,all the plumbing, cell, shocks, brackets ...blah blah blah. I have driven both types of cars (thanks to the HS89 crew) and prefer a leaf spring car. A leaf spring car works better when there is some bite in the track, you can drive it harder because the springs are non-linear meaning the more they bow, the more pressure they have. Coil (Metric) cars are linear meaning if the coil is rated at 175# then after an inch thats all it is going to be. Metric cars seem to be better on a dry slick so if you get a leaf car be prepared to learn setup tricks and throttle control. HS89 is also correct about the skins, take that into account when buying ... ask yourself AND the seller how available parts are. I wouldn't recommend a 1975 cordoba .... lol Call me if you need more help 832-435-5454 Chris
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bonescrub
Newbie
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Posts: 7


« Reply #14 on: September 28, 2007, 02:48:02 am »

Thanks for all the great info. Kinda overwhelming  trying to learn about all of this. Can a person who is not racing go in the pits? Figured there would be a car for sale on any given night?
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